Planning before implementing NTFS Permissions

If you’re a Windows Administrator, you’ve probably experienced the nightmares in managing folder permissions. This is common in large or even small environment where no proper planning is made before giving the permissions. Such negligence could lead to complication and exposes the environment to security risk. Below are some examples:

  • Users or groups having access to folders not intended for them (e.g., Sales Group can view Management’s folders)
  • Applications fail to run because of lack of permission (e.g., Backup Software unable to perform tasks on specific folders)
  • Or just too convoluted folder permission that Admins are better off doing them from scratch.

Why Planning is a Crucial Step Before Implementing NTFS Permissions

 

All above examples are all due to incorrect planning (or the lack of it) before the implementation of NTFS permissions. One may point out that it can also be due incompetency of the person doing the task. I agree that could also happen, but if there is proper planning, documentation, and layout, these problems can be avoided even if you let your junior admin do the task.

As part of the Planning phase, here are some of the things an Admin can do:

Design a Folder Structure

Before creating the actual folders, you must know what folders are to be created. Whether you prefer digital or physical board, list the shares that will be created for each department or group. Work with the knowledge you already have of your current environment. There will be changes along the way (e.g. new department or new projects) but this would be a good start.

Identify who has access

After listing the shares to be created, map out the users or groups that have access to specific folders. You may List down the users or groups and draw a line to connect them to the appropriate shares. How ever you want this done, make sure to have fun doing it!

Plan the Permissions

This one is critical so take your time going through the shares and groups and write down the appropriate permission. If you use naming conventions such as R for Read-only or F for Full Control, make sure to be consistent to avoid confusion along the way.

Proper Documentation

A good planning always has good documentation. It’s always good to have something to go back to when you forget. This not only serves as your guide but something you can pass down to your junior staff or even to your boss. With that said, documentation must be clear and concise. Also, changes in the organization are inevitable so whatever method you used to document, make sure it can easily be modified and expanded.

Being an Admin can be stressful, but if you have proper planning, implementation, and clear documentation, it smoothens administration and helps you focus on other areas.

A more detailed guide on Planning and Managing NTFS Permissions can be found here. Download your free course now!

 

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